CFP| Workshop on Development Economics

Professor Almudena Sevilla is organising a workshop on development on June 8th as part of CGR research activities. Confirmed speakers are Kaivan Munshi (Professor of Economics at Cambridge University) and Adrienne Lucas (Associate Professor at Delaware University) .

World map by income 2017
Downloaded from http://databank.worldbank.org/data/download/site-content/wdi/maps/2017/world-by-income-wdi-2017.pdf

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Brown Bag Seminar | Children, Earnings and Careers in an Internal Labour Market

On Wednesday 14th of March, Prof. Claudio Lucifora (Catholic University of the Sacred Heart Milan) will be presenting his research.

Abstract

Using a unique 12-years panel of personnel records from a large French company, we find that becoming mother (extensive fertility margins) largely affects labour market outcomes. Instead, fatherhood does not significantly impact on men’s wages or careers. An event study approach with the use of non-parents as control group enables us to show that, prior to childbirth, future mothers’ earnings are in line with that of non-mothers. However, one year after birth, they start to fall, reaching -9% in total pay and -30% in individual bonuses. This drop is persistent: 8 years after childbirth there is no evidence of a catching-up trend. Mothers also have lower chances to climb-up the hierarchy of the firm and be promoted to managerial positions. A decomposition of the motherhood penalty shows that these “missed promotions”, likely due to an increase in absenteeism during the child’s pre-school age, are the main determinants of mothers’ lower outcomes within the firm.

Lucifota, C., Meurs, D. and Villar, E. (Jan, 2018)

Brown Bag Seminar | Collateral Damage? Labour Market Effects of Competing with China – at Home and Abroad

On Wednesday 7th of March, Professor Pedro Martins (SBM) will be presenting his research.

Abstract

The increased range and quality of China’s exports is a major ongoing development in the international economy with potentially far-reaching effects, including in labour markets. On top of the direct effects of increased imports from China studied in previous research, in this paper we also examine the indirect labour market effects stemming from increased export competition in third markets. Our evidence, based on matched employer-employee panel data from Portugal covering 1991-2008 period, indicates that workers’ earnings and employment are significantly negatively affected by China’s imports, but essentially only through the indirect, ‘market-stealing’ channel. The results are robust to a number of checks, including an alternative measure of the indirect effects, and are found to be stronger for women, older and less educated workers, and workers in domestic firms.

Cabral, S., Martins, P., dos Santos, J. and Tavares, M. (Feb, 2018)

Making bad economies: The poverty of Mexican drug cartels

By Roxana Gutiérrez-Romero
Re-blogged

Some stories say that local economies benefit from cartels in Mexico. But research suggests that the areas most plagued by drug-related violence have seriously suffered economically. 

Mexico is facing one of the most violent episodes in its recent history. The country has had over 200,000 drug-related killings since 2006. Last year alone, 29,168 homicides were recorded, reaching the highest homicide rate over the last 20 years, surpassing the previous historical peak in 2011 when drug cartel violence accounted for nearly half of all national homicides.

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CGR in the news | Professor Granville interviewed by The New York Times

As Brexit Looms, Paris Tries a Business Makeover
By David Segal / 10 Dec 2017 / New York Times

(…) “When you grow up in France, none of the heroes you learn about are entrepreneurs,” said Brigitte Granville, a professor of economics at Queen Mary University of London, who was raised in France. “When someone gets rich in France, people immediately ask, ‘What did he do to make this money? He must be a nasty person.’” (…)

Read full article here

Against minimalistic Europe: More democracy and more participation to make integration stronger

By Beatriz Rodriguez-Satizabal

Dr Stella Ladi, programme co-director of the Masters in Public Administration (MPA) and member of CGR, participated as a panellist in a debate about the recently published book Reset Europe: New directions for the EU written by Richard Youngs. The event organised by the Centre for European Research at QMUL by Sarah Wolff, CER director, started with Youngs presentation of his book and finalised with a roundtable discussion.

2018-01-22 18.36.06

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